The Plan

The NC Task Force for Healthy Weight in Children and Youth created a comprehensive state plan, Moving Our Children Toward a Healthy: Weight Finding the Will and the Way. The Plan outlines 12 key recommendations for action to address childhood overweight.

Moving Our Children Toward a Healthy Weight: Finding the Will and the Way

NC Healthy Weight Key Recommendations

Key Recommendations

  • Ensure that all children and youth participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day.
  • Limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Limit TV/video time to no more than 1-2 hours a day.
  • Provide appropriate portion sizes of foods and beverages.
  • Prepare and eat more meals at home.
  • Set state standards for all foods and beverages available in schools, after-school programs and child care.
  • Establish state policies to ensure adequate time for physical activity in schools, including quality daily physical education, recess and after-school activities.
  • Provide more community-based opportunities for leisure-time/recreational physical activity for all children and youth.
  • Create an environment that makes healthy eating and active lifestyles the norm rather than the exception.
  • Define obesity as a disease and ensure third-party coverage for prevention and treatment services for children who are overweight or at-risk for overweight.
  • Ensure equitable access to childhood overweight prevention and treatment services to reduce health disparities.
  • Ensure a comprehensive, continuous and reliable system for monitoring body mass index ( BMI), weight-related chronic diseases, and nutrition and physical activity behaviors in children and youth.

 

NCHWI History

The NC Healthy Weight Initiative (HWI) was established in October 2000 as an impetus to prevent overweight in children. Originally funded by an obesity prevention grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Initiative was housed within the Women's and Children's Health Section of the Division of Public Health. The NC Task Force for Healthy Weight in Children and Youth created a comprehensive state plan, Moving Our Children Toward a Healthy Weight - Finding the Will and the Way, to reduce and prevent childhood overweight. The plan was developed by a 100-member Task Force, chaired by John B. Longenecker, PhD, Director of the University of North Carolina Institute of Nutrition.

The Healthy Weight Plan outlines 12 key recommendations for action by families, schools and childcare, communities, health care, media and researchers. Some of the recommendations encourage individuals and families to eat healthier and be more active. Others are broader in scope. They provide direction for policy and environmental change that will make healthy eating and physical activity easy, fun and popular, so they will become a way of life for children and teens. Other recommendations deal with health care policy change and improved surveillance and research.

The following are only a few examples of how the NC Healthy Weight Initiative has helped bring about purposeful change to address the overweight and obesity epidemic:

  • Eat Smart: North Carolina’s Standards For All Foods Available In School were released in May 2004 for local education agencies and others to use to establish policies that will create healthy school nutrition environments across the state.
  • The NC Health & Wellness Trust Fund Commission allocated $10.2 million for obesity prevention over the next three years (2004-2007), awarding grants to 20 local and state organizations.
  • The Eat Smart Move More…NC and NC Healthy Weight Initiative community grants, totaling more than $220,000, will be awarded for the second year (2003-04 and 2004-05) to local health departments and their community partners. The goal is to create policy and environmental change at the local level that promotes healthy eating, physical activity and healthy weight.
  • In January 2003, the State Board of Education adopted the Healthy Active Children Policy that supports increased physical education and physical activity in schools. In addition, each local education agency must form a School Health Advisory Council and develop a Coordinated School Health plan. The plans are due in July 2004 for implementation in the 2004-05 school year.
  • In partnership with the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, the Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Childcare (NAPSACC) was developed and pilot tested as a means of increasing opportunities for physical activity and access to healthy foods in child care settings. NAPSACC will be implemented across the state in the coming year.
  • NC Action for Healthy Kids adopted two of the HWI recommendations as its top priorities. NC Action for Healthy Kids’ goals are: to establish state standards for all foods and beverages available in schools; and to establish state policies to ensure adequate time for physical activity in schools, including physical education, recess and after-school activities.
  • The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Task Force for Healthy Weight in Children and Youth, established by the Mecklenburg County Health Department at the direction of the County Commissioners, is using the HWI state plan in the development of its recommendations and actions. The intervention centerpiece is Fit City Challenge, a community-wide call to action designed to get individuals eating smart and moving more. The Mecklenburg Board of Commissioners adopted the Action Item May 20, 2003.

North Carolina Healthy Weight Initiative, in support of Eat Smart, Move More...North Carolina

NC Dept. of Health and Human Services, | NC Division of Public Health

Disclaimer

Please direct all site inquiries to webmaster@eatsmartmovemorenc.com